Inc: “Like most every other source of negotiation advice, Getting to Yes begins by saying that however much you think negotiation is part of your life, you’re underestimating. ‘Everyone negotiates something every day,’ according to the introduction. ‘All of us negotiate many times a day,’ G. Richard Shell ups the ante in the opening to Bargaining for Advantage . Many of the authors suggest that you negotiate with your children or your spouse all the time. ‘Your real world is a giant negotiating table,’ Cohen writes in his book. Patton and Getting to Yes ‘s principal authors, Roger Fisher and William Ury, had earlier collaborated on a book for international mediators, which is of course a rather small audience. The idea of Getting to Yes was to translate their thinking about multilateral peace agreements into lessons that might be applied to more quotidian forms of negotiation. The new audience would be all of those who have ever figured they were getting screwed when they tried to argue for a raise, dicker with cantankerous suppliers, sell a used car, or buy a new house.”

via Ron Huxley.

 

Originally posted by Dane Carlson on March 4, 2004 in Ideas.

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