When is the last time you were jabbed with a needle in the name of health care? One inventor hopes to relieve some of that pain.

Oliver Blackwell says his pain-free needle could be used in millions of procedures every year and lead to a more pleasant experience for patients. He also says it will reduce the risk of contamination and improve efficiency for doctors and nurses working on the wards.

In appearance, the pain-free cannula is little different than the needles used on wards up and down the country every day. But attached on the front, there is a much smaller needle which administers around 0.2ml of local anaesthetic, to ease discomfort from the larger needle that follows.

Mr Blackwell said: “We knew that doctors would not want an instrument that was hugely different to the ones they use now, hence we have kept it similar to an everyday cannula. But at the moment, if they want to use a local anaesthetic they have to use two needles, find keys and go to the medicine cupboard separately and it all takes time and effort.

“Our design cuts down that process but still ensures the patient’s comfort, meaning they have less pain and the doctor isn’t dealing with a traumatised patient. It also eradicates the risk of confusion or contamination because hospital staff will only have one needle instead of two.”

Photo by Blake Patterson

Originally posted by Angela Shupe on March 21, 2014 in News.

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