Last week we profiled a unique invention that made it possible to store earbuds on a bracelet, allowing people to take their earbuds anywhere without losing them. This week I had the opportunity to ask Mark Williams a few questions about the Budwrap, and his goals for the product.

Tell us about the Budwrap.

The Budwrap is a fun new product! The bottom line is that earbuds get tangled, and it’s highly annoying. The Budwrap is a silicone bracelet that manages that tangled mess. You can wear the Budwrap on your wrist for convenient access to your earbuds, or you can use the Budwrap in other ways to manage your cords. Personally, I love it :)

What colors does it come in? Do you plan to add more variety in the future?

My initial colors will be black and red. I plan to add 5 additional colors in the near future. I will keep everyone posted on my website.

What was the inventing process like for you? Tell us a little about your journey from idea to final product.

The invention process was very fun and challenging all at the same time. I was extremely excited when I started, but a bit naive as well. I thought I had a simple idea that would be easy to design and manufacturer. I imagined I could work hard for like 8 – 10 months and have my new product on the market without a problem — nope, not true! I didn’t have a clue where to start, and every step of the process took at least twice as long as I expected. I gathered as much knowledge as I could on the internet and read books to help my understanding of the process. I muddled through somehow. At key moments throughout the process I was able to reflect on the journey and realized it was really taking form…it was actually happening! I can’t explain the exhilaration of seeing my product materialize from idea to creation. Overall, I can truly say it’s been the best learning experience of my life… and I still have a long way to go with marketing and distribution ahead of me.

How long did it take for you to bring the Budwrap to this stage?

It has taken over 3 and half years from the day the idea popped into my head to this stage. That seems like a long time I know, but I’ve held onto my day job the entire time. I’ve mainly used nights and weekends to work on the Budwrap.

I know you have your idea listed on Kickstarter to try and obtain some funding. What prompted you to take this approach over other funding options?

I think it’s one of the best places for idea people to “test the waters.” Kickstarter provides a way for people to pre-order your product if they like it enough and want to be a part of its success. I could get funding in other ways, but I wanted to see if the Budwrap would start some buzz from Kickstarter before I actually forked over thousands of dollars to make the mold for the Budwrap and begin mass production.

Do you have any goals you’d like to accomplish over the next year or so?

My short-term goals are to find my golden ticket to mastering marketing, retail and distribution.

What are some lessons the inventing process has taught you?

Good question! I’ve learned to just take risks…small ones. The people who never take any risks at all are those still dreaming of the possibilities. I’ve also learned to have patience with my dream and know that I can’t force my future to be something that isn’t in God’s plan. If the Budwrap doesn’t work out the way I’ve hoped, there’s always another idea waiting to be discovered. So, I guess what I’m saying is I’ve learned not to put all my hopes and dreams into making lots of money. I love my family, I’m loving life, and I’m loving my inventor’s journey!

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

Yes — there’s no obligation to this, but if your readers would like to pledge $15 or more toward the Budwrap on Kickstarter I will give that person a bonus red colored Budwrap for free. All you have to do is drop me a message that you read this article on Dane Carlson’s Business Opportunities Weblog and we will make it happen!

Do you have any advice you’d like to offer fellow inventor/entrepreneurs that are just getting started?

Don’t be afraid to ask questions and find experts to help you get started. I wish I would’ve joined a local inventor group or sought the advice of local businessmen/women. With that said, don’t fall into the scam of those invent-help companies. Find someone who genuinely wants to help you through the process.

Originally posted by Angela Shupe on July 6, 2014 in Featured / Interviews / Inventions.

StumbleUpon


Related Posts

import export business