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Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius
Ian CinnamonIF EVIL'S YOUR NAME, THEN THESE ARE YOUR GAMES! Always wanted to be a genius game creator? This Evil Genius guide goes far beyond a typical programming class or text to reveal insider tips for breaking the rules and constructing wickedly fun games that you can tweak and customize to suit your needs! In Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius, programming wunderkind Ian Cinnamon gives you everything you need to create and control 57 gaming projects. You'll find easy-to-follow plans featuring Java, the most universal programming language, that run on any PC, Mac, or Linux computer. Illustrated instructions and plans for an awesome mix of racing, board, shoot 'em up, strategy, retro, and puzzle games Gaming projects that vary in difficulty-starting with simple programs and progressing to sophisticated projects for programmers with advanced skills An interactive companion website featuring a free Java compiler, where you can share your projects with Evil Geniuses around the globe Removes the frustration-factor-all the parts you need are listed, along with sources Regardless of your skill level, Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius provides you with all the strategies, code, and insider programming advice you need to build and test your games with ease, such as: Radical Racing Screen Skier Whack an Evil Genius Tic-Tac-Toe Boxing Snake Pit Space Destroyers Bomb Diffuser Trapper Oiram Java Man Memory Ian Says
Game Programming for Teens
Maneesh SethiDo you enjoy playing video games and want to learn how to create your own? "Game Programming for Teens, Third Edition" shows you how to design and develop a complete video game from start to finish, no prior programming knowledge required. You'll begin by learning the basics of BlitzMax, a simple cross-platform game programming language that can be used on Windows, Mac, or Linux operating systems. Once you understand how to write the programming code, you'll begin to incorporate all the graphical elements of games including varying colors, loading and displaying images, and creating scrolling backgrounds. Finally, you'll learn how to add sound and music, use keyboard input codes, and even integrate artificial intelligence. New skills are taught step-by-step, and each chapter builds upon the techniques you learned in the previous, so by the end of the book you'll have built your very own fully functioning video game. And the CD-ROM contains all the source code, art and sound files, and demo versions of BlitzMax and the other programs used in the book. So don't just play video games, build your own, with "Game Programming for Teens, Third Edition!"
The Big Book of Team-Motivating Games: Spirit-Building, Problem-Solving and Communication Games for Every Group (Big Book Series)
Mary Scannell and Edward ScannellTeamwork can be fun! Games that improve team cooperation, communication, and spirit Did you know that games can: Raise sagging morale Liven up boring staff meetings Increase interaction among staff members Promote a culture of harmony and cooperation Create an atmosphere of fun for your team Keeping your team motivated and challenged, especially during tough economic times, can be difficult. But this collection of high-energy, play-anywhere games, from bestselling authors and trainers Ed and Mary Scannell, provides you with all the fun, inspiring material you need to build team spirit, communication, and trust among coworkers-day in and day out. Games Can Be Played In or Out of the Office Requiring few or no props, The Big Book of Team-Motivating Games is the latest installment in the successful Big Book series, which has been changing the way teams think for decades-providing hours of fun that fight boredom and burnout, boost performance, soothe tensions, and create a sense of community and trust.
The Big Book of Customer Service Training Games (Big Book Series)
Peggy Carlaw and Vasudha DemingHelp your employees to excel in dealing with the public with this stimulating, fun-filled collection of customer service training games. Designed not only to teach important skills but also to spark enthusiasm and a high level of involvement in the participants, these games utilize entertaining and instructive techniques such as role-playing, charades, brainstorming, and debate. As a result of these exercises, employees will learn how to create a rapport with the customer, how to focus on the unique needs of individual customers, how to maintain a positive attitude, and more.
Play Money: Or, How I Quit My Day Job and Made Millions Trading Virtual Loot
Julian DibbellPlay Money explores the remarkable new phenomenon of MMORPGs, or Massively MultiPlayer Online Role-Playing Games, in which hundreds of thousands of players operate fantasy characters in virtual environments. With city-sized populations, these games generate their own cultures, governments, and social systems and, inevitably, their own economies, which spill over into the real world. The desire for virtual goods-magic swords, enchanted breastplates, and special, hard-to-get elixirs-has spawned a cottage industry of “virtual loot farmers”: people who play the games just to obtain fantasy goods that they can sell in the real world. The best loot farmers can make between six figures a year and six figures a month. Play Money is an extended walk on the weird side: a vivid snapshot of a subculture whose denizens were once the stuff of mere sociological spectacle but now-with computer gaming poised to eclipse all otherentertainments in dollar volume, and with the lines between play and work, virtual and real increasingly blurred-look more and more like the future.
Cheating: Gaining Advantage in Videogames
Mia ConsalvoThe widely varying experiences of players of digital games challenge the notions that there is only one correct way to play a game. Some players routinely use cheat codes, consult strategy guides, or buy and sell in-game accounts, while others consider any or all of these practices off limits. Meanwhile, the game industry works to constrain certain readings or activities and promote certain ways of playing. In Cheating, Mia Consalvo investigates how players choose to play games, and what happens when they can't always play the way they'd like. She explores a broad range of player behavior, including cheating (alone and in groups), examines the varying ways that players and industry define cheating, describes how the game industry itself has helped systematize cheating, and studies online cheating in context in an online ethnography of Final Fantasy XI. She develops the concept of "gaming capital" as a key way to understand individuals' interaction with games, information about games, the game industry, and other players.Consalvo provides a cultural history of cheating in videogames, looking at how the packaging and selling of such cheat-enablers as cheat books, GameSharks, and mod chips created a cheat industry. She investigates how players themselves define cheating and how their playing choices can be understood, with particular attention to online cheating. Finally, she examines the growth of the peripheral game industries that produce information about games rather than actual games. Digital games are spaces for play and experimentation; the way we use and think about digital games, Consalvo argues, is crucially important and reflects ethical choices in gameplay and elsewhere.
Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python, 2nd Edition
Al Sweigart"Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python" teaches you computer programming in the Python programming language. Each chapter gives you the complete source code for a new game and teaches the programming concepts from these examples. The book is available under a Creative Commons license and can be downloaded in full for free from http://inventwithpython.com "Invent with Python" was written to be understandable by kids as young as 10 to 12 years old, although it is great for anyone of any age who has never programmed before. This second edition has revised and expanded content, including using the Pygame library to make games with graphics, animation, and sound.
Beginning Android Games
Mario ZechnerBeginning Android Games offers everything you need to join the ranks of successful Android game developers. You'll start with game design fundamentals and programming basics, and then progress towards creating your own basic game engine and playable games. This will give you everything you need to branch out and write your own Android games. The potential user base and the wide array of available high-performance devices makes Android an attractive target for aspiring game developers. Do you have an awesome idea for the next break-through mobile gaming title? Beginning Android Games will help you kick-start your project. The book will guide you through the process of making several example games for the Android platform, and involves a wide range of topics: The fundamentals of game development The Android platform basics to apply those fundamentals in the context of making a game The design of 2D and 3D games and their successful implementation on the Android platform For those looking to learn about Android tablet game app development or want Android 4 SDK specific coverage, check out Beginning Android 4 Games Development, now available from Apress. What you’ll learn How to set up and use the development tools for developing your first Android application The fundamentals of game programming in the context of the Android platform How to use the Android's APIs for graphics (Canvas, OpenGL ES 1.0/1.1), audio, and user input to reflect those fundamentals How to develop two 2D games from scratch, based on the Canvas API and OpenGL ES. How to create a full-featured 3D game How to publish your games, get crash reports, and support your users How to complete your own playable 2D OpenGL games Who this book is for This book is for people with a basic knowledge of Java who want to write games on the Android platform. It also offers information for experienced game developers about the pitfalls and peculiarities of the platform. Table of Contents Android, the New Kid on the Block First Steps with the Android SDK Game Development 101 Android for Game Developers An Android Game Development Framework Mr. Nom Invades Android OpenGL ES: A Gentle Introduction 2D Game Programming Tricks Super Jumper: A 2D OpenGL ES Game OpenGL ES: Going 3D 3D Programming Tricks Droid Invaders: the Grand Finale Publishing Your Game What’s Next?
Play Money: Or, How I Quit My Day Job and Made Millions Trading Virtual Loot
Julian DibbellPlay Money explores a remarkable new phenomenon that's just beginning to enter public consciousness: MMORPGs, or Massively MultiPlayer Online Role-Playing Games, in which hundreds of thousands of players operate fantasy characters in virtual environments the size of continents. With city-sized populations of nearly full-time players, these games generate their own cultures, governments, and social systems and, inevitably, their own economies, which spill over into the real world.The desire for virtual goods--magic swords, enchanted breastplates, and special, hard-to-get elixirs--has spawned a cottage industry of "virtual loot farmers": People who play the games just to obtain fantasy goods that they can sell in the real world. The best loot farmers can make between six figures a year and six figures a month.Play Money is an extended walk on the weird side: a vivid snapshot of a subculture whose denizens were once the stuff of mere sociological spectacle but now--with computer gaming poised to eclipse all other entertainments in dollar volume, and with the lines between play and work, virtual and real increasingly blurred--look more and more like the future.
Money Sense for Kids
Hollis Page HarmanUpdated with new illustrations showing new-issue currency, new information, and several new features, this popular title for older boys and girls tells the story of money.How and where is it printed?What do all those long numbers and special letters on currency mean?How are the newly designed bills improvements over the old ones?How can banks afford to pay interest?Here too are questions and answers that have special meaning for kids. For example, how can boys and girls find savings programs designed especially for them? How can they establish their own bank account, write checks, and use an ATM card? How can kids learn about stocks—and even start to invest their own money? The author offers ideas on how kids can earn, save, budget, and invest money of their own. She also presents puzzles and games that focus on the theme of money. The book’s fascinating text is supplemented with two-color diagrams and illustrations on nearly every page. (Ages 8 and older)

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