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 TitleAuthorDescription
Going Local: Creating Self-Reliant Communities in a Global Age
Michael ShumanNational drug chains squeeze local pharmacies out of business, while corporate downsizing ships jobs overseas. All across America, communities large and small are losing control of their economies to outside interests. Going Local shows how some cities and towns are fighting back. Refusing to be overcome by Wal-Marts and layoffs, they are taking over abandoned factories, switching to local produce and manufactured goods, and pushing banks to loan money to local citizens. Shuman details how dozens of communities are recapturing their own economies with these new strategies, investing not in outsiders but in locally owned businesses.
Growing Local Value: How to Build Business Partnerships That Strengthen Your Community (Social Venture Network)
Laury Hammel and Gun DenhartHanna Andersson founder Gun Denhart and successful entrepreneur Laury Hammel show how every aspect of a business (from product creation to employee recruitment to vendor selection) holds the dual promise of bigger profits and a stronger local community With practical tools and real-life examples of the best practitioners and techniques of values-driven business, Growing Local Value provides a framework for the full spectrum of ways in which a business can contribute to its community, and the benefits a company receives when it does so. Key features Offers tried-and-tested practical advice and a variety of real life examples in a short, convenient format. This cheap, user-friendly guide facilitates immediate real-world implementation In each chapter, the authors walk readers through key best practices and share inspiring stories of how a host of socially responsible entrepreneurs have already made substantial contributions to their community
Everything I Want To Do Is Illegal: War Stories From the Local Food Front
Joel SalatinDrawing upon 40 years' experience as an ecological farmer and marketer, Joel Salatin explains with humor and passion why Americans do not have the freedom to choose the food they purchase and eat. From child labor regulations to food inspection, bureaucrats provide themselves sole discretion over what food is available in the local marketplace. Their system favors industrial, global corporate food systems and discourages community-based food commerce, resulting in homogenized selection, mediocre quality, and exposure to non-organic farming practices. Salatin's expert insight explains why local food is expensive and difficult to find and will illuminate for the reader a deeper understanding of the industrial food complex.
The Transition Handbook: From Oil Dependency to Local Resilience (Transition Guides)
Rob HopkinsWe live in an oil-dependent world, arriving at this level of dependency in a very short space of time by treating petroleum as if it were in infinite supply. Most of us avoid thinking about what happens when oil runs out (or becomes prohibitively expensive), but The Transition Handbook shows how the inevitable and profound changes ahead can have a positive outcome. These changes can lead to the rebirth of local communities that will grow more of their own food, generate their own power, and build their own houses using local materials. They can also encourage the development of local currencies to keep money in the local area.There are now over 30 "transition towns" in the UK, Australia and New Zealand with more joining as the idea takes off. They provide valuable experience and lessons-learned for those of us on this side of the Atlantic. With little proactive thinking at the governmental level, communities are taking matters into their own hands and acting locally. If your town is not a transition town, this upbeat guide offers you the tools for starting the process.
The Small-Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses Are Beating the Global Competition (BK Currents (Paperback))
Michael H ShumanDefenders of globalization, free markets, and free trade insist there's no alternative to mega-stores like Wal-Mart -- Michael Shuman begs to differ. In "The Small-Mart Revolution, Shuman makes a compelling case for his alternative business model, one in which communities reap the benefits of "going local" in four key spending categories: goods, services, energy, and finance. He argues that despite the endless media coverage of multinational conglomerates, local businesses give more to charity, adapt more easily to rising labor and environmental standards, and produce more wealth for a community. They also spend more locally, thereby increasing community income and creating wealth and jobs. "The Small-Mart Revolution presents a visionary yet practical roadmap for everyone concerned with mitigating the worst of globalization.
No B.S. Grassroots Marketing: Ultimate No Holds Barred Take No Prisoners Guide to Growing Sales and Profits of Local Small Businesses
Dan S. Kennedy and Jeff SlutskyBe a Small Business with BIG IMPACT Called the “professor of harsh reality,” Dan S. Kennedy, joined by local-level marketing specialist Jeff Slutsky, delivers a hard-to-swallow truth to local small business owners like you: You Are in a Fight for Your Life. As a local small business you’re vulnerable to distant online discounters, big box retailers, and other competition, you’ve got to do more than merely get customers—you have to keep them FOR LIFE. And, you have to win them over where your competition can’t—at the street level. Kennedy and Slutsky present local business owners, retailers, service providers, restaurateurs, and professional practice owners with a tactical grassroots marketing plan to help increase customer retention, generate greater referrals, and build a thriving business for the long-term. Covers: 9 inconvenient truths of grassroots marketing Zero-Based Marketing—the solution when you figure out traditional and “non-traditional” marketing is failing you How to use the media as an extension of personality and of relationship—NOT a substitute for it Why most local marketing programs fail and what you need to do to succeed (a 7-Step Plan and tactics) On-site promotions—increase revenue without spending money, time or leaving your operation How to use—and how to waste dollars on—the Internet and other technology PLUS gain access to: FREE – Glazer-Kennedy University Webinar Series FREE – Elite Gold Insider’s Circle Membership* FREE – Income Explosion Guide & CD FREE – Income Explosion FAST START Tele-Seminar
Financial Management for Public, Health, and Not-for-Profit Organizations (3rd Edition)
Steven A. Finkler One of the few texts that addresses financial and managerial accounting within the three major areas of the public sector. Introduction to Financial Management.;  Planning for Success: Budgeting;  Additional Budgeting Concepts; Understanding Costs; Capital Budgeting; Long-Term Financing; Managing Short-Term Resource and Obligations; Accountability and Control; Taking Stock of Where You Are: The Balance Sheet.; Reporting the Results of Operations: The Activity and Cash Flow Statements; Unique Aspects of Accounting for Health Care and Not-for-Profit Organizations; Unique Aspects of Accounting for State and Local Governments; Unique Aspects of Accounting for State and Local Governments – Part II: Reporting Financial Results; Financial Statement Analysis; Unique Aspects of Accounting for State and Local Governments  MARKET: Financial Management for Public, Health, and Not-for-Profit provides the fundamentals of financial management for those pursuing careers within the public, health and not-for-profit fields. With a unique presentation that explains the rules specific to the public sector, this book outlines the framework for readers to access and apply financial information more effectively.
Creating Wealth: Growing Local Economies with Local Currencies
Gwendolyn Hallsmith and Bernard LietaerCommunities everywhere are challenged by issues such as health, elder and child care, housing, education, food security, and the environment. On the surface, these problems appear to be rooted in economic crisis—for example, budget cuts have triggered reduced public services, soaring food prices have created food security concerns, and the subprime mortgage disaster has spawned record increases in foreclosures and homelessness.However, if communities could match their unmet needs with their underutilized resources, many would find that while their economies may be struggling when measured in traditional terms, they possess enough genuine wealth to allow all their inhabitants to enjoy a vastly improved quality of life. Creating Wealth demonstrates how a healthy society can be attained through developing new systems of exchange. Using creative initiatives such as time banks, systems of barter and exchange, and local currencies, cities and towns can empower themselves and build vibrant, healthy, sustainable local economies.In addition to presenting many compelling case studies of successful alternative currencies in action, Creating Wealth also explores the different types of capital that communities have to draw on, including natural, built, social, human, institutional, cultural, technological, and financial. This book will appeal to community activists, city planners and other public officials, and anyone interested in developing strong local economies.Gwendolyn Hallsmith is the founder and director of Global Community Initiatives and the author of The Key to Sustainable Cities.Bernard Lietaer is the world's leading authority on complementary currencies and the author of The Future of Money.
Planning Local Economic Development: Theory and Practice
Edward J. Blakely and Nancey Green LeighSince the appearance of the first edition in 1990, Planning Local Economic Development has been the foundation for an entire generation of practitioners and academics working in planning and policy development. Written by authors with years of academic, regional, and city planning experience, the book has been used widely in graduate economic development, urban studies, nonprofit management, and public administration courses. Now thoroughly updated for the challenges of the 21st century and with new coverage of sustainability, the Fourth Edition explores the theories of local economic development while addressing the issues and opportunities faced by cities, towns, and local entities to craft their economic destinies within the global economy. Authors Edward J. Blakely and Nancey Green Leigh provide a thoroughly up-to-date exploration of planning processes, analytical techniques, and locality, business, and human resource development, as well as high technology and sustainable economic development strategies. New to This Edition Incorporates sustainability into the definition and practice of local economic developmentOffers new case studies, illustrations, and exercises Takes a fresh look at the state of the economic development profession Addresses local economic development planning’s response to a climate-challenged world Planning Local Economic Development, Fourth Edition, is ideal for graduate courses in Economic Development, Urban Studies, Nonprofit Management, Economics/Public Finance, and Public Administration. Economic development specialists in local and municipal government in the United States and internationally, as well as nonprofit organizations, will also find this an essential reference.
The Homevoter Hypothesis: How Home Values Influence Local Government Taxation, School Finance, and Land-Use Policies
William A. FischelJust as investors want the companies they hold equity in to do well, homeowners have a financial interest in the success of their communities. If neighborhood schools are good, if property taxes and crime rates are low, then the value of the homeowner's principal asset--his home--will rise. Thus, as William Fischel shows, homeowners become watchful citizens of local government, not merely to improve their quality of life, but also to counteract the risk to their largest asset, a risk that cannot be diversified. Meanwhile, their vigilance promotes a municipal governance that provides services more efficiently than do the state or national government.Fischel has coined the portmanteau word "homevoter" to crystallize the connection between homeownership and political involvement. The link neatly explains several vexing puzzles, such as why displacement of local taxation by state funds reduces school quality and why local governments are more likely to be efficient providers of environmental amenities. The Homevoter Hypothesis thereby makes a strong case for decentralization of the fiscal and regulatory functions of government. (20011227)