FYI This website is in beta mode.

How to Start a Profitable Backyard Plant Nursery

Starting a backyard plant nursery can be a wonderful way to turn your love of plants and growing into a steady monthly income. It's one of the best ways to "bootstrap" a few hundred dollars into a good income. When people think of a plant nursery, the local garden center usually comes to mind. Fact is, most garden centers produce very few of the plants they sell. Instead, they purchase their plants from specialty nurseries, who actually grow the plants.

 TitleAuthorDescription
So You Want to Start a Nursery
Tony AventWhen Avent announced that he was quitting his job to build a specialty nursery, his former horticulture professor begged his student to reconsider, telling him he couldn't possibly make a profit "without doing something illegal." More than ten years and 20 nursery catalogs later, Avent owns a thriving national business with nearly 30 employees. He wrote So You Want to Start a Nursery to debunk myths about the ornamental-plants nursery business and what it takes to succeed, whether you're a backyard hobbyist or a wholesale grower. (And he still has a clean arrest record.) Assuming that the reader has some basic knowledge about how plants are grown, Avent focuses on the business and planning concerns of the nursery owner. While recounting humorous stories of his baptism by fire as a beginning nurseryman, Avent also provides a primer on the nursery industry as a whole, with discussions of the merits and disadvantages of retail, wholesale, mail-order, and liner operations, to name just a few. Readers of this book will obtain the tools they need to make a business plan of their own. This book is a must-read for horticulture students, industry insiders, and advanced gardeners who dream of turning their passion for plants into a job they love.
Growing Profits: How to Start & Operate a Backyard Nursery
Michael HarlanA backyard nursery is a great business opportunity for the person seeking some level of self-employment. It can be a full-time operation for the entrepreneur, or a part-time enterprise for a stay-at-home Mom, the retiree who wants to supplement a pension, or the landscaper who wants to make additional income by both selling and installing plants.
An American Cutting Garden: A Primer for Growing Cut Flowers Where Summers Are Hot and Winters Are Cold
Suzanne McIntireIn An American Cutting Garden Suzanne McIntire describes how to plan a cutting garden, choose suitable plants, keep the garden in good order, and harvest a bountiful crop—all with charm and humor. Using both common and botanical names, she discusses in depth a wide variety of herbaceous perennials, biennials, annuals, and bulbs. McIntire includes information on topics such as the length of stems one might expect from the cutting garden, how many plants are needed of any one kind, when and how to sow seed outdoors, the heat-hardiness of plants, and strategies for coping with the effects of hot summers and cold winters.Suzanne McIntire is a freelance writer and seasoned veteran of gardening in northern Virginia. She is the editor of The American Heritage Book of Great American Speeches for Young People.
A Field Guide to Medicinal Plants and Herbs: Of Eastern and Central North America (Peterson Field Guides)
Steven Foster and James A. DukeWith more than 300 photos, this new edition shows how to identify more than 500 healing plants. Descriptive text includes information on where the plants are found, as well as their known medicinal uses. An index to medical topics, symbols next to plant descriptions, and organization of plants by colors all make this an essential guide to understanding the traditional medicinal uses of the plants around us. At a time when interest in herbs and natural medicine has never been higher, the second edition of this essential guide shows how to identify more than five hundred kinds of healing plants. More than three hundred new color photos illustrate their flowers, leaves, and fruits. The updated descriptive text includes information on where the plants are found as well as their known medicinal uses. An index to medical topics is helpful for quickly locating information on specific ailments, from asthma and headaches to colds and stomachaches. Symbols next to plant descriptions give readers a quick visual alert to plants that are poisonous or may cause allergic reactions. Organized by plant color for fast identification, this guide is an indispensable tool for understanding the traditional medicinal uses of the plants and herbs around us.
Encyclopedia of Aquarium Plants
Peter HiscockThis heavily illustrated volume will prove a blessing to every aquarium hobbyist who has had to settle for superficial plant descriptions in general fish-keeping books. It presents a detailed A-to-Z directory covering hundreds of aquarium plants with high quality color photos and succinct profiles of each plant. Information includes the plant's common name, botanical designation, growth cycle, and general description. The book's additional sections offer details on how to grow and propagate aquatic plants, and how to protect them from parasites and other problems. This handsome volume features approximately 450 color photos and illustrations.
Ball RedBook, Volume 2: Crop Production: 17th edition
Offering detailed information on the production of 162 flower, herb, and vegetable crops, this essential resource for growers includes techniques and advice that work in real-life production, not just in the lab or trial greenhouse. Offered is information on how to decide what to grow, as well as tips about temperature, media, plant nutrition, irrigation, water quality, light, crop scheduling, and growth regulators. Details about propagation, growing, pest and disease control, troubleshooting, and post-harvest care are presented and arranged by genus name. Plants represented include annuals, perennials, pot foliage plants, flowering potted plants, herbs, and some vegetable bedding plants.
Backyard Medicine: Harvest and Make Your Own Herbal Remedies
Julie Bruton-Seal and Matthew Seal"A wonderful book that all herbalists need. It embodies a heartfelt love of herbalism combined with clearly articulated scientific insights."—David Hoffmann B.Sc., FNIMH, Medical HerbalistBackyard Medicine is a beautiful book, packed with nearly 300 color photographs and over 120 herbal remedies that you can make yourself. It gives a fascinating insight into the literary, historic, and world-wide application of the fifty common plants that it covers. It is the sort of book you can enjoy as an armchair reader or use to harvest and make your own herbal remedies from wild plants. Anyone who wants to improve his or her health in the same way that human-kind has done for centuries around the world, by using local wild plants and herbs, will find this book fascinating and useful. 416 color illustrations
Drip Irrigation for Every Landscape and All Climates, 2nd edition
Robert KourikDrip irrigation is the best way to help any plant flourish and survive tough times, especially short or long droughts. Pick the wrong "stuff " and you easily can feel overwhelmed. Robert Kourik's Drip Irrigation for Every Landscape and All Climates clearly explains how to use less water yet increase the yields of vegetables and promote the growth and flowering of all plants--trees, shrubs, and container plants--in any climate, even where it rains irregularly.In the tradition of the original groundbreaking book, this fully revised edition incorporates new information essential for gardeners, including how to manage limited water supplies with precision and efficiency, without the clutter of hundreds of widgets and gizmos, and the knowledge is shared in Kourik's inimitable, friendly, down-to-earth, and easy-to-understand style.Drip Irrigation for Every Landscape and All Climates, reveals how to:Utilize drip irrigation for everything you grow--trees, shrubs, hanging plants, container plants, and vegetable and flower gardens --and save up to 50 percent of your water compared to sprinklers.Use a streamlined configuration of hardware and tubing.Choose the best, sturdiest hardware that will last for decades in your home landscape and vegetable garden.Pick tubing that has no emitters punched on the outside--these have a tendency to break off--and use this tubing buried beneath the surface to irrigate without losing any water to wind or evaporation.Roll out a drip system in a very short period of time, avoiding tedious hours punching in emitters or adding smaller tubing to reach each plant.Capture and reuse gray water and cistern water for irrigation.Construct a system in which the main parts are effectively hidden or can be simply attached to an existing garden faucet.Individual projects are carefully detailed and include: how anyone can construct a system by attaching it to an existing garden faucet or the main water supply, constructing larger assemblies for big gardens, irrigating all sizes of potted plants, easy ways to irrigate a vegetable garden, and how to lay out tubing for the best health of trees and shrubs.
Ball RedBook: Crop Production
Offering detailed information on the production of 162 flower, herb, and vegetable crops, this essential resource for growers includes techniques and advice that work in real-life production, not just in the lab or trial greenhouses. Information is offered on how to decide what to grow, as well as tips on temperature, media, plant nutrition, irrigation, water quality, light, crop scheduling, and growth regulators. Details about propagation, growing, pest and disease control, troubleshooting, and postharvest care are presented and arranged by genus name. The plants represented in this compendium include annuals, perennials, flowering potted plants, herbs, and some vegetable bedding plants.
Understanding Garden Design: The Complete Handbook for Aspiring Designers
Vanessa Gardner Nagel APLDDesigning a garden is a complex task. Where do you start? What kind of skills do you need? What are the logical steps in creating a design? How do you communicate your ideas to a client, and how do you accommodate a client’s requests while maintaining the integrity of the project? The answers to these questions, and many more, can all be found in Understanding Garden Design.Most books on garden design focus on only one or a few aspects of garden design—choosing plants or creating a hardscape, for example. This comprehensive, accessible book lays out the entire process from start to finish in clear, precise language that avoids the pitfalls of “designspeak.” In fact, garden owners and clients of garden designers who want to understand more about the designer’s craft will be able to profit from the book’s lessons.Among the many topics covered are how to document a site, how to determine what a client needs and wants from the garden, how to take architectural features into consideration, how to think about circulation and lay out paths, how to use basic design principles, how to work with plants, and how to create a final design. Practical aspects are clearly laid out, including working with contractors and staying on top of the various phases of construction. This thorough handbook is profusely illustrated with helpful photographs and diagrams. A particularly interesting tool is the hypothetical garden plan that appears in each chapter to show how to apply the topics at hand. A practical, logical approach to the planning, design, and installation of a garden, this volume will be an invaluable resource for students, landscape professionals, and garden designers.