Forbes has an interesting story about how much money you would save if you skipped Christmas.

The single biggest category of Christmas spending is gifts. This year the National Retail Federation projects that spending on gifts will drop only slightly, after a dramatic decrease of over 30% during the 2008 holiday season.

According to the annual Gallup poll on holiday spending, last year’s spending on gifts was down from a high of $862 in 2005. So if you choose to forgo all the gift-giving, you’ll pocket, on average, approximately $750.68.

Entrepreneurs began selling the ubiquitous Christmas tree commercially in the U.S. in 1850. Today, whether you choose to venture into one of the nation’s 12,000 cut-your-own Christmas tree farms or pick up a pre-cut one at your local hardware store, a real tree will set you back approximately $41.50.

Decking the halls isn’t free. On top of your Christmas tree cost, if you’re like the average American, you’re looking at spending in the neighborhood of $51.43 on tinsel, lights and ornaments.

Choosing to pass on Christmas could save your family a pretty penny–just about $1,000 (if you weren’t planning to travel) and nearly $2,000 if you normally travel but choose to stay at home this year

Photo by alcide.