The bow and arrow may not be the most common weapon used today, but it is still a popular niche for business. Enthusiasts enjoy the sport of hunting or simply using their favorite bow for target practice. Velocitip is counting on it, reports Boston Herald.

“You put the device on the arrow to collect flight data and flight characteristics,” Donahoe said. “It’s based on the inertial navigation system that’s been used in planes and rockets for decades. It’s just a lot smaller obviously.”

Donahoe packed his three passions — bow hunting, electrical engineering and patent lawyering — into the Velocitip Ballistic System, a “pioneering” product aimed at serious archers who want to fine-tune their shots and sporting goods manufacturers that want to put their bows and arrows to the test.

The $1,100 Velocitip—slightly longer than a typical field point and weighing 100 grains, or about 6.5 grams—features microelectronics and an accelerometer that record up to four shots worth of data at a time. The removable aluminum tip slides into a handheld “docking station” that Donahoe designed for easy downloading and feedback on arrow flights.

“As long as you can hit the target, you can determine what’s happening downrange. A user can easily create a profile of their kinetic energy and velocity as their shot distance changes,” he said.

Photo by Valocitip

Originally posted by Angela Shupe on April 27, 2014 in Inventions.

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